Volunteer Instructor Professor, Department of Orthopaedics, University of Cincinnati
Adjunct Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati
M.D., University of Michigan Medical School
Resident, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
Clinical Fellow in Sports Medicine and Hand Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
Board Certified, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
Member, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Member, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine
Member, American Orthopaedic Association A.O. Scholar, Harborview Hospital, Seattle Washington
Member, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery: Recertification Examination Committee
Member, Herodicus Society
Member, Academy of Medicine of Cincinnati
Former Member, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: Clinical Committee of Sports Medicine Education Committee
Former Member, American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery: Recertification Examination Committee
Exam Committee; Clinical Committee of Sports Education and Education Committee

Dr. Thomas N. Lindenfeld, a board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and other orthopaedic problems is from St. Joseph, Michigan. He attended the University of Michigan for both undergraduate and medical school. At the University of Louisville, Dr. Lindenfeld completed his first two years of residency in general surgery. He then went on to complete his orthopaedic residency at the University of Iowa where he also completed his fellowships for both sports medicine and hand surgery.

In 1984, Dr. Lindenfeld joined Cincinnati SportsMedicine and Orthopaedic Center as an Associate Director. He has extensive experience with knee and shoulder surgery, including ligament reconstruction, meniscal (cartilage) repair, total joint replacement, rotator cuff repair and shoulder stabilization and hip arthroplasty. He continues to practice sports medicine and general orthopaedics and performs total joint replacement of the hip, knee and shoulder. Dr. Lindenfeld has developed a special interest in upper extremity problems with the shoulder and elbow. He has written original articles on elbow arthroscopy and has developd new techniques for stabilization after shoulder dislocation. Through his interest in the shoulder, he has found that many problems may be handled through physical therapy and not surgery.

Dr. Lindenfeld stays busy outside the Center as well. Recently, Dr. Lindenfeld was elected into the prestigious American Orthopaedic Association (AOA). The association elects new members each year based on their siginficant contribution to education, research and the practice of orthopaedic surgery. The AOA currently has 580 active members from the 23,243 board certified orthopaedists in the country. In 1988 and 2001, Dr. Lindenfeld was the recipient of the prestigious O’Donoghue Award given annually by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine for outstanding research. He has been a visiting professor at several medical universities, has published numerous articles in peer-reviewed journals, is a reviewer for four orthopaedic journals and presents at national orthopaedic conferences. He has served as a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeon’s Education Committeee and Clinical Committeee on Sports Medicine. Dr. Lindenfeld has also served as a member of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery’s Recertification Examination committee. He has also served on the NFL’s Safety Committeee. He was selected by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as Co-Chairman of their annual comprehensive course discussion evaluation and treatment of shoulder and knee disorders in the athlete.

Among other areas of research at Cincinnati SportsMedicine, Dr. Lindenfeld has studied the relationship between serious knee injury and hormonal fluctuations in female athletes, the strength and thickness of structures in the posterior capsule of the shoulder to help understand each structure’s role in stabilizing the capsule; and the evaluation and treatment of impingement syndrome. He is currently working on a project to carefully measure range of motion in the shoulder and it’s relationship to upper extremity injury. In 1998, he received a highly sought after grant from the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation to further evaluate the relationship between serious knee injury and hormonal fluctionations in women. Because of his expertise in the area of prevention of knee injury in the female athlete, he was selected by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’s Women’s Oversight Panel on Musculoskeletal Health Issues, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, NCAA and the NATA Research and Education Foundation to participate in a first-ever consensus conference developing a plan for future prevention strategies.

Each physician at the Center is very active in education. Dr. Lindenfeld plays an integral role in the Cincinnati SportsMedicine Fellowship Program and is often an invited guest speaker at schools and community groups to address injury prevention topics, orthopaedic treatment advances and sports medicine.

Dr. Lindenfeld sees patients both young and old. Not only has he treated patients on-site at local nursing homes for many years, but he also remains involved in local high school activities volunteering at high school pre-season physican and coaches clinics. Dr. Lindenfeld also has a special interest in treating shoulder problems, especially in swimmers, having been a competitive swimmer himself for many years. Dr. Lindenfeld is the team physician for Badin High School and helps with Queen City Gymnastics.

Dr. Lindenfeld is licensed in Ohio, Kentucky, and Iowa.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Degree: none (accepted without degree to Medical School),
Honors: James B. Angell Scholar (Top 5% of class)
1971-1974

Medical School: University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Degree: M.D.
1974-1978

Residency: University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky
General Surgery – Hiram Polk, Chairman
1978-1980 (first and second year residency)

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa
Orthopaedic Surgery – Reginald R. Cooper, Chairman
1980-1983 (third through fifth year residency)

Fellowships: Sports Medicine Fellow
University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa
John P. Albright, M.D.
1983-1984
Hand and Microvascular Surgery Fellow
University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa
William F. Blair, M.D.
1983-1984

A.O. Scholar
Harborview Hospital, Seattle, Washington
Sig Hansen, M.D.
July, 1984

Other Positions: Staff Trauma Physician
University of Iowa
April, 1984

Anatomical
Knee reconstruction, arthritis, instability, cartilage injury
Treatment
Arthroscopic Surgery, Joint Replacement, partial joint replacement, Sports Medicine

1.         LindenfeldTN:  Grand Rounds.  The widening definition of familial polyposes.  Journal  of Kentucky Medical Association, 78(1):29-31, 1980.

2.         LindenfeldTN:  Arthroscopically aided meniscal repair.  Orthopedics, 10(9):1293-1296,   1987.

3.         Noyes FR, LindenfeldTN, Marshall MT:  What determines an athletic injury  (definition)?  Who determines an injury (occurrence)?  American Journal of Sports  Medicine, 16(1):S65-268, 1988.  Special Edition:  Sports Injury Research.  Noyes FR,  Albright JP (eds), American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

4.         LindenfeldTN, Noyes FR, Marshall MT:  Components of injury reporting systems.  American Journal of Sports Medicine, 16(1):S69-S80, 1988.  Special Edition:  Sports Injury Research.  Noyes FR, Albright JP (eds), American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

5.         LindenfeldTN:  Arthroscopically aided meniscal repair.  American Journal of Knee Surgery, l(2):146-149, 1988.

6.         Wroble RR, LindenfeldTN:  The stabilized Lachman test.  Clinical Orthopedics andRelated Research, 237:209-212, 1988.

7.         LindenfeldTN:  The differentiation and treatment of ankle sprains. Orthopedics, 11(1):203-206, 1988.

8.         Grood ES, Hefzy MS, LindenfeldTN:  Factors affecting the region of most isometric femoral attachments. Part I: The posterior cruciate ligament.  Winner of the 1988    O’Donoghue Award. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 17(2):197-207, 1989.

9.         LindenfeldTN:  Medial approach in elbow arthroscopy.  American Journal of Sports Medicine, 18(4):413-417, 1990.

10.       Oster DM, LindenfeldTN:  Meniscus: function and repair.  The Iowa Orthopaedic Journal, 10:79-84, 1990.

11.       LindenfeldTN, Schmitt DJ, Hendy MP, Mangine RE, Noyes FR:  Incidence of injury in indoor soccer.  American Journal of Sports Medicine, 22(3):364-371, 1994.

12.       LindenfeldTN:  In:  Wojtys EM (ed):  The ACL Deficient Knee.  AAOS Monograph  Series, AAOS, Rosemont, IL, 1994.

13.       LindenfeldTN, Bach BR Jr, Wojtys EM:  Reflex sympathetic dystrophy and pain dysfunction in the lower extremity.  Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 78A(12):1936- 1944, 1996.

14.       LindenfeldTN, Bach BR Jr, Wojtys EM:  Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy and Pain  Dysfunction in the Lower Extremity. In:  Springfield DS (ed):  Instructional Course Lectures.  Vol. 46, pgs. 261-268.  AAOS:  Rosemont, 1997.

15.       Bach BR Jr, Wojtys EM, LindenfeldTN:  Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, patella infera contracture syndrome, and loss of motion following anterior cruciate ligament surgery. In:  Springfield DS (ed):  Instructional Course Lectures.  Vol. 46, pgs. 251-260.  AAOS:  Rosemont, 1997.

16.       Wojtys EM, Oakes B, LindenfeldTN, Bach BR Jr:  Patella infera syndrome:  An analysis of the patellar tendon pathology.  In:  Springfield DS (ed):  Instructional Course Lectures. Vol. 46, pgs. 241-250.  AAOS:  Rosemont, 1997.

17.       LindenfeldTN, Hewett TE, Andriacchi TP:  Joint loading with valgus bracing in patients  with varus gonarthrosis.  Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 344:290-297, 1997.

18.       LindenfeldTN:  Recognizing and managing reflex sympathetic dystrophy.  Journal of   Musculoskeletal Medicine, 15(4):41-53, 1998.

19.       Nixon RT Jr, LindenfeldTN:  Early rehabilitation after a modified inferior capsular shift  procedure for multidirectional instability of the shoulder.  Orthopedics, 21(4):441-445,     1998.

20.       Wojtys EM, Huston LJ, LindenfeldTN, Hewett TE, Greenfield MLVH:  Association between the menstrual cycle and anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 26(5):614-619, 1998.

21.       Rubman MH, LindenfeldTN:  Arthroscopic meniscus repair:  Inside-out technique.  In: Craig EV (ed):  Clinical Orthopaedics.  pgs. 732-740.  Lippincott Williams and Wilkins: Philadelphia, 1999.

22.       Hewett TE, LindenfeldTN, Riccobene JV, Noyes FR:  The effect of neuromuscular training on the incidence of knee injury in female athletes.  A prospective study.  American Journal of Sports Medicine, 27(6):699-706, 1999.

23.       Lindenfeld TN, Wojtys EM, Husain A:  Operative treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee.  Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 81A(12):1772-1784, 1999.

24.       Mannor DA, LindenfeldTN:  Spinal process apophysitis mimics spondylolysis:  Case reports.  American Journal of Sports Medicine, 28(2):257-260, 2000.

25.       LindenfeldTN, Wojtys EM, Husain A:  Surgical treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee.  In:  Price CT (ed). Instructional Course Lectures.  Rosemont:  AAOS;  49, 211-221, 2000.

26.       Griffin LY, Agel J, Albohm MJ, Arendt EA, Dick R, Garrett WE, Garrick JG, Hewett  TE, Huston L, Ireland ML, Johnson R, Kibler WB, Lephart S, Lewis JL, Lindenfeld TN  et al.:  Noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries:  Risk factors and prevention  strategies.  Journal of the AmericanAcademy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, 8(3):141-150,         2000.

27.       Hewett TE, Levy M, Lindenfeld TN, Noyes FR:  Letter to the Editor, American Journal of Sports Medicine, 28(4):615-616, 2000.

28.       LindenfeldTN, Hewett TE:  Developing dynamic knee stability in female athletes.  How,   When and Why.  Women’s Health Orthopedic Edition.  3(6):195-202, 2000.

29.       Mehta S, LindenfeldTN:  Reflex sympathetic dystrophy.  In:  DeLee JC, Drez D, Miller MD (eds):  DeLee and Drez’s Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, 2nd edition, W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia, 2000.

30.       Wojtys EM, Huston LJ, Boynton MD, Spindler KP, Lindenfeld TN:  The effect of the menstrual cycle on anterior cruciate ligament injuries in women as determined by hormone levels. Am J Sports Med 30: 182-188, 2002.

31.       Bey MJ, Hunter SA, Kilambi N, Butler DL, LindenfeldTN.  Structural and mechanical properties of the glenohumeral joint posterior capsule.  J Shoulder and Elbow Surgery,  14(12): 201-206, 2005.

32.       Lindenfeld TN, Parikh SN. Heel-thump test for syndesmotic ankle sprain.  Foot and  Ankle International, 26(5):406-8, 2005.

33.       LindenfeldTN.  Inside-out meniscus repair.  In: Instructional Course Lectures. Rosemont: AAOS; 54, 331-336, 2005.

34.       Lindenfeld T:  Inside-out meniscal repair. In Ireland ML (ed.):Instructional Course  Lectures, Sports Medicine, AmericanAcademy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Rosemont, IL.,  2006.

35.       Lindenfeld T:  Surgical treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee. In Ireland ML (ed.):  Instructional Course Lectures, Sports Medicine, AmericanAcademy of Orthopaedic  Surgeons, Rosemont, IL., 2006.

36.       Chaudhari AM, LindenfeldTN, Andriacchi TP, et al.  Knee and hip loading patterns at  different phases in the menstrual cycle: implications for the gender difference in anterior  cruciate ligament injury rates.  Am J Sports Med, 35(5): 793-800, 2007.

37.       Austin JA, Hasan SS, Heckmann TP, LindenfeldTN.  Posterior Shoulder Instability.  In:  The Athlete’s Shoulder, 2nded.  Editors: Wilk KE, Reinold MM, Andrews JR.  Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2009: Chapter 18, pp. 209-228.

38.       Saxton DL, Lindenfeld TN.  Complex regional pain syndromes including reflex sympathetic dystrophy and causalgia.  Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, 3rd Edition, DeLee JC, Drez D, Miller MD (eds.), Elsevier, Philadelphia, 2009, pp. 351-369

39.       Frush TJ, Lindenfeld TN.  Peri-epiphyseal and overuse injuries in adolescent athletes. Sports Health, 2009 1(3): 201-211.

40.       Saxton D, Lindenfeld TN, Noyes FR.  Diagnosis and treatment of complex regional pain syndrome.  Noyes Knee Disorders: Surgery, Rehabilitation and Clinical Outcomes, Noyes FR, Barber-Westin SD (eds.), Saunders, Philadelphia, 2009, pp. 1116-1133.

41.       McCormack MA, Lindenfeld TN, Barber-Westin SD: Comparing two devices used to regain full range of motion following arthroscopic subacromial decompression for shoulder impingement. J Athletic Training Sports Health Care, 4(1): 21-28, 2012.

42.       Ramsey JA, Aboka AM, Lindenfeld TN.  Complex regional pain syndromes including  reflex sympathetic dystrophy and causalgia.  Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, 4th Edition,  DeLee JC, Drez D, Miller MD (eds.), Elsevier, Philadelphia, In Press, 2013.